Bug-Out Bags and 72-Hour Packs



Bullet Blocker Bug-Out-Bag

BulletBlocker is an American company located in Lowell, Massachusetts. Welcome to our website.

People often ask: Why have a Bug-Out Bag? When natural disasters or other calamities strike, those who don't have one must depend on others for their survival. If you believe in being responsible, prepared, self-sufficient, and want to keep your loved ones safe, a Bug-Out Bag can help. Government mobilization of emergency services and goods is not always guaranteed to reach you quickly and you could be left waiting days or even weeks. Most casualties of natural disasters like Katrina, Sumatra, and Mount St. Helens are a result of the massive and widespread devastation that ensues in the aftermath. The devastation takes out electricity, clean water, makes travel difficult, and is often accompanied by widespread evacuation. Stores are closed, medical services are unavailable, and phones may not make connections. For all practical purposes, citizens are left to fend for themselves.

How do you know which bag to use? It should be large enough to hold all your items, but keep in mind you still want to be able to carry it comfortably. A good rule of thumb is the total weight of the bag should be no more than 15-20% of the wearers body weight. Our bulletproof backpacks (here) are light weight, come in a variety of sizes/styles to meet your specific needs, and all have a level 3A ballistic panel sewn in to enhance your safety in a time of disaster.

People often wonder what to include in their Bug-Out Bag. Because the space in your kit is limited, you want to pack the life-saving essentials first and then add other items depending on the bag’s space and wearers’ strength. When compiling a list of what to pack, remember that many of the items you select will depend on your unique circumstances (i.e. medical needs, dietary restrictions, etc.). Otherwise, almost all Bug-Out Bags contain the following:

Our Covert Bulletproof BackpackBullet Blocker Covert Backpack

 

Food:

Enough non-perishable food to last 72 hours* 
12 liters of water (preferably bottled).
Metal cooking pan
Can Opener
Serrated Spoons
Metal Cups and Eating Tins
Waterproof matches, butane lighter and Fire starter tablets
Table Salt
Water purification Tablets

Health and Safety:

First Aid Kit and Manual**
Sanitation Supplies (TP, baby-wipes, hand cleanser, toothbrush)
Foot powder
Feminine hygiene products
Soap
Supply of prescription medications
Epinephrine and antihistamines for allergic reactions
Hydrogen Peroxide
Rubbing Alcohol
Lip Balm
Sunscreen
Insect Repellant
Several extra pairs of socks

Utility:

Tube tent, bivvy bag or tarp
Fixed-blade Knife and/or Swiss-Army Knife
Radio (battery or hand crank)
Flashlight (battery or hand crank, glow sticks)
Hatchet with safety sleeve
Crowbar
Rope or strong cord
Duck tape
Large plastic Trash Bags
Waterproof containers

Additional Contingency Materials:

Extra clothes and bedding
Cash and Coins
Pre-written/developed disaster plan including locations of emergency centers, rally points, evacuation routes, etc.
Maps and travel information
Firearm and ammunition subject to local laws
Compass and/or GPS
Commercial water filters.
Mirror
Flares
Sharpening Tool

*Recommendations include canned food, Meals-Ready-to Eat, energy bars, etc. Depending on your size, it is suggested that you consume between 4,000 and 6,000 calories per day depending upon level of physical activity.
**Bandages, sterile pads, gauze, first aid tape, tweezers, surgical razor, disinfectant pads, aspirin, any prescription meds, etc. (preferably kept in a waterproof container).

As you can see, the essentials add up quickly. Assuming you will be able to reach a safety center within 72 hours, the packing list can be condensed into 15 critical items:

  • Enough non-perishable food to last 72 hours.
  • 12 liters of water (preferably bottled).
  • Swiss Army Knife & Can Opener
  • First Aid Kit and Manual
  • Sanitation Supplies (TP, baby-wipes, hand cleanser, toothbrush)
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Extra clothes and bedding
  • Cash and Coins
  • Pre-written/developed disaster plan including locations of emergency centers, rally points, evacuation routes, etc.
  • Maps and travel information
  • Radio (battery or hand crank)
  • Flashlight (battery or hand crank, glow sticks)
  • Hatchet with safety sleeve
  • Tarp
  • Rope

The more people you need to provide for, the more supplies and Bug-Out Bags you will need. However, each pack does not need all of the items referenced for the full bug-out kit. You can begin dividing the critical essentials like food, water, and extra clothes into each person’s bag. If space permits, you can add more discretionary or contingency items - like extra toilet paper, extra hygiene items, small books to help you relax, additional protection, or other items to suit your needs. If it comes down to a choice between food or water, take the water. Gatorade is always a good addition.

Foot Care: When it comes to clothes, never underestimate the value of several extra pairs of socks. Your feet will be carrying a lot of extra weight and potentially traveling further than you ever have before. Take care of your feet and they will take care of you. It helps considerably to wear two pairs of socks to reduce friction and blisters. Regularly changing your socks will help keep your feet clean, dry, and comfortable.

 

 

 

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